Posts tagged research
Multiple perspectives and policy innovation: The potential creativity of implementing policy across roles and sectors

Today’s post is by Chloe Duncan from the Public Service Research Group, UNSW Canberra, and it explores how the personal identity and experiences of policy practitioners and service providers can inform their practice in profound ways. Based on PhD research into the implementation of breastfeeding policy in Victoria, it suggests that the ability to draw on multiple perspectives, both professional and personal, can allow policy implementers to overcome significant challenges in their work by devising creative and innovative solutions to problems. 

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Supporting NDIS participants’ interpersonal relationships – is a critical ingredient to the scheme’s success being neglected?

In today’s post, Laura Davy (@LauraKDavy) from the Public Service Group, UNSW Canberra and Ariella Meltzer (@ariella_meltzer) from the Centre for Social Impact, UNSW Sydney argue that under current policy settings, the answer to this question is yes. Summarising the findings of research just published in the Australian Journal of Public Administration, they outline three ways in which the scheme’s approach to supporting relationships is insufficient and explore how these limitations can be rectified.

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Evidence and Management of the 7 Deadly Sins in Performance Management: Because People will be People

Kicking off an exciting week of posts from the Public Service Research Group at UNSW Canberra, today’s post from Professor Deborah Blackman (@debbiebl2), Dr Fiona Buick (@fibuick) and Professor Michael O’Donnell explores the ‘seven deadly sins’ of performance management that emerged in their recent research.

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Trailblazers working together in cross-sector initiative to address financial exclusion

The Financial Inclusion Action Plan (FIAP) is an innovative collaboration that sees organisations across industry, government, not-for-profits and education coming together to improve financial inclusion and resilience across Australia. Here Vinita Godinho and Abigail Powell explain the importance of a program such as this and reveal findings from the evaluation of phase one of the FIAP program.

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Taking Stalking Seriously

Stalking as a phenomenon has been noted in human behaviour for well over a century.  References to obsessive behaviour and the need to retain intimacy with another person can be seen in the writing of Victorian author, Louise May Alcott, who wrote Little Women. In her novel, A Long Fatal Love Chase, a woman is chased across the seas for years by her estranged husband, until he mistakenly kills her whilst trying to murder her new partner. Holding her dead body in his arms, the ‘stalker’ then kills himself and as he does so he says “Mine first - mine last – mine even in the grave!” This obsession to the point of murder is not a sensational, fictitious idea but a behaviour which is worryingly still prevalent within our society in 2017. In this blog post Victoria Charleston, Policy Officer at Suzy Lamplugh Trust explores stalking and potential implications for policy.

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Using psychological insights to communicate with policymakers

This week on Power to Persuade, we are focusing on 'Impact'—how can academic research make a contribution to society? How can it influence the development of policy, practice or service provision? In today's post, Paul Cairney and Richard Kwiatkowski explore the importance of using insights from psychological science to effectively communicate research to policymakers. A modified version of this post originally appeared on Paul's blog.

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What do we actually do when we do impact?

'Impact' is a fickle concept. We talk about it a lot, but what does it really mean? What form does it take in practice? And what can we do, as researchers and policymakers, to support its emergence? Impact is our theme this week on Power to Persuade. To kick us off, today's post by University of Stirling Senior Lecturer Dr Peter Matthews (@urbaneprofessor) reports on new research from the United Kingdom that explores how academics perceive barriers to achieving impact. This post originally appeared on Peter's blog and has been edited for length.

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So you want to change policy? Six steps for academics looking to achieve policy change

The inevitable chaos and unpredictability of politics makes trying to achieve policy change a real challenge. But that doesn’t mean academics should just give up. Drawing from policy analysis and public affairs lessons in the UK, James Lloyd, Director of the London-based think tank the Strategic Society Centre, recommends six steps to get researchers going in the right direction towards achieving policy change.

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Integration and Implementation insights - Integration, part 2: the "how"

In this post, Julie Thompson Klein draws together and guides us through the “abundance of resources” that exist to help teams working on inter- and transdisciplinary projects find common ground and advance common goals. The post includes links to five searchable repositories to assist researchers in this sphere. This post originally appeared on the Integration and Implementation Insights blog and is reposted with permission.

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Does measuring poverty multidimensionally make a difference?

There have been various attempts in Australian research to measure the 'multidimensional' nature of poverty- that is, adding things like rental stress or health inequity to ordinary income measures. In this post, which originally appeared on the LSE Politics & Policy blog, Rod Hick looks at comparing multidimensional and income poverty measures.

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ANZSOG call out for examples of cross-sector partnerships

In partnership with Curtin University, ANZSOG (Australia and New Zealand School of Government) Research has recently funded a number of case studies that look at joint efforts of public, not-for-profit (NFP) and business sector actors working together on public policy problems. This letter below is a call out for examples of recent and ongoing policy/service delivery initiatives that rely upon coordination and cooperation between public sector entities and not-for-profits. 

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Women’s Policy Action Tank: Workplace policies must change to reflect 21st century realities

There are so many policies that intersect at the level of the family, which either enable or create barriers to active workforce participation while also ensuring family needs are met.  Today’s Scorecard summarises what the major issues are for families, gender equity in the workforce, an ageing population, and carer duties.  This synopsis is backed by a comprehensive document created by the Work + Family Policy Roundtable, comprised of over 30 academics from 16 research institutions.  This analysis was first published in The Sydney Morning Herald on 30 May, 2016.  

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Still Hesitating? Let's bust some myths around increasing stakeholder participation in evaluation

Participation in evaluation, actually participation in everything to do with social policy, is frequently seen as time-consuming and expensive. But does it have to be? Leslie Groves and Irene Guijt identify the common perceived barriers for the use of participatory methods in evaluation, and suggest that our resistance to participation in evaluation runs deeper than we think.

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Flexible childcare to match our '24/7' economy:The Federal nanny trials

The 'new' nanny trial has been hailed as a solution for flexible child care by the Federal government. But is it a solution and for whom? What do children, families and nannies need to make this 'solution' work well? Our guest today, Elizabeth Adamson (@eama221) from the Social Policy Research Centre, explores these issues as she takes us through details of the nanny trial.

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Research with and for Marginalised Communities

In this article, Andrew Ryder outlines the thinking behind his new venture The Roma Research Exchange. This venture seeks to work with civil society and other community organisations to better identify priorities for research. Andrew outlines his thinking about emancipatory practice, knowledge construction, and the limitations of the traditional academic framework, all of which inform the development of this Exchange.

This article is a repost from the Policy and Politics Journal Blog.

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The evaluation theory tree

I have been working in the field of evaluation for the past eight years and I think what I have learnt most about evaluation in this time is that it is a crowded market. A lot of people are involved in the practice of evaluation. And while I have never conducted a scientific study, I have found it truly shocking how many practising evaluators know little to nothing about evaluation theory. Or know a lot about applied research methods and consider this an acceptable substitute for knowledge about evaluation.

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Fools Gold. RCTs are neither golden nor a standard.

As a professional evaluator, nothing gets my goat like reading the phrase: 'Randomised Control Trials (RCT's) are the gold standard of evaluation'. When I read this I always yell 'NO THEY ARE NOT' to my cat. (She doesn't care as she is a supporter of RCTs.) RCTs are a good evaluation method, but they are NOT the gold standard! There is no such thing as an evaluation method that is best and most appropriate across all contexts.

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