NDIS hiccups are expected, as with any large-scale social reform

From the online portal to enrolment targets to workforce shortages, the implementation of the National Disability Insurance Scheme has been plagued with difficulties. But A/Prof Helen Dickinson (@DrHDickinson) cautions that we don't yet have enough information to make definitive statements about success and failure. We should expect some challenges to arise as the NDIS is implemented, and this doesn’t mean that the idea is fundamentally flawed.

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Aggressive outsourcing undermining service quality and trust

Governments wringing too many savings out of outsourced risk is threatening the commercial and political sustainability of the whole enterprise, warns one of Australia’s top government contracting experts. For the Australia and New Zealand School of Government's Prof Gary Sturgess, it’s becoming a ‘game of chicken’ where the players want out.

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The Cost of Collaboration: More than budgeted for?

Collaboration is a popular and often routine exercise for the public, private and community sectors to develop a common purpose, as well as co-design and/or co-deliver policies or services. But the costs of these interactions are often underestimated. Robyn Keast, Michael Charles and Piotr Modzelewski argue that a detailed cost-benefit analysis should be undertaken before undergoing collaboration.

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Even less choice: the latest on the ADHC transfer of services

In recent years, social services recipients have had limited choice in service providers, but in New South Wales, these choices are further restricted by the state government's transfer of disability services to the non-government sector. The blog post below is NSW Council for Intellectual Disability's commentary on this development, and is a repost from the Council's website.

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When we can’t see the forest for the trees: exploring the invisibility of eating disorders in mental health contexts.

For UK based researchers, practitioners and policy makers interested in the area of eating disorders 2017 marks an important milestone. This year the updated National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) guidelines will be published in the UK after a 14 year wait. This is a long awaited release as these guidelines provide momentous support to professionals on the frontline of services by helping to inform the best care and treatment modalities for the most vulnerable. The 15 year wait begs many questions - none more so than why so long? In the post below, Dr Una Foye looks at why eating disorders have not received sufficient attention in mental health contexts.

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Is Assistive Technology a Human Rights issue for People Living with Dementia?

Persistent long-term growth in the world’s population has brought with it significant public health concerns. The global demographic is ageing, chronic disease is on the rise and these concerns for health and welfare systems require action in a time of economic uncertainty. Over 46 million people worldwide are currently living with dementia and this figure is set to treble in the next 35 years (Prince et al., 2015). In the post below, Dr Jennifer Lynch looks at if Assistive Technology is a human rights issue for people living with dementia.

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