Posts tagged susan maury
When policy limits self-efficacy

Positive psychology is the emerging field that examines what allows people to thrive.  In this blog post, Policy Whisperer Susan Maury of Good Shepherd AustraliaNew Zealand makes a case for considering self-efficacy when designing or evaluating government policy. 

Please note that some links embedded in this blog post contain photos of Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander people who may be deceased. 

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The girl effect, or why being smart just isn't enough

The highly-publicised gender pay gap matters for reasons of equity and fairness, but also because women are disproportionately disadvantaged as a consequence.  Research and Policy Specialist Susan Maury, from Good Shepherd Australia New Zealand, unpacks some of the reasons for gendered disparities as well as some actions that can be taken to mitigate them. 

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Why wellbeing matters in the policy debate

Government policy ought to be designed to help its citizens flourish in a sustainable environment (in all its manifestations). When considering policy changes, it’s helpful to use evidence from a range of disciplines. Psychology tends to be an under-utilised area, yet it is rich with explorations into human motivation. Susan Maury, Policy Researcher with Good Shepherd Australia New Zealand, has written previously about motivation research and changes in unemployment payments. Here she discusses why policy should be crafted to support creative thinking – particularly for those who struggle.

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Outcomes: who decides?

There is plenty of debate about outcomes in the social services sector at the moment: how to identify them, how to measure them, how to use them for continuous improvement, and how to report back on them. Recently, Susan Maury, Policy & Research Specialist with Good Shepherd Australia New Zealand @GoodAdvocacy @SusanMaury, presented on an unusual approach to developing outcomes. Here she expands on the possibilities.

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The economics of abuse

Family violence is headline news in Victoria these days. The Victorian Labor Government has established a much-needed Royal Commission into the support system, including a review of the justice system, government, service organisations, police, corrections, and child protection, with the aim of decreasing instances, improving victim support, and ensuring perpetrators are held to account. Susan Maury, Policy and Research Specialist with Good Shepherd Australia New Zealand, argues that, as the least-understood form of family violence, economic abuse needs to receive significant attention.

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Power to Persuade: a Twitter guide to social policy change and challenge

The third annual Power to Persuade symposium was held in Melbourne this week. Thanks to Susan Maury, Social Policy Researcher at Good Shepherd Youth and Family Service for putting together this comprehensive Twitter account of the day. Click the Storify link below if you missed or would like to refresh your memory of the conversations the event generated, in the room and beyond.

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Carrots or sticks? How policies stack up to the evidence on motivating behaviour change

The current government’s reform agenda has been analysed from many angles.  In this article Susan Maury, Social Policy Researcher from Good Shepherd Australia New Zealand, suggests using the lens of motivational psychology to design effective responses to complex social problems. Policies such as ‘work for the dole’ have not proven nearly as effective as holistic support such as Youth Connections, which had 94% of participants still engaged in employment or education six months after completing the program. There is a wealth of evidence about what motivates people to change their behaviour that does not seem to be part of the current policy debate.

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